A Ten Year Plan To Abolish Wage Slavery

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It would seem inevitable that as soon as someone utters the phrase 'wage slavery' that their solution, invariably, is to replace it with another kind of slavery

The direct actions of the working class only aims to reduce hours of labor to a point that is incompatible with production for profit of capital and revenues of the state. 
But won’t capital respond to our direct actions by increased use of machine? 
Yes. This is exactly how capital will respond. When you know how your enemy must respond to your action, you have already defeated them. Capital is entirely motivated by profit. If we interrupt production for profit, capital will respond by automating production of use values.  This is not a bug. It’s a feature of the strategy.  Communism requires a very high technical level of development of social production. Even where our direct action does not immediately put an end to wage slavery, capital is forced to respond to our direct action by progressively shedding wage labor itself. This is what makes the strategy so powerful, I believe. Production for profit is a blind, unconscious process. Our direct action is immediately aimed to bring an end to production for profit. If we succeed, capitalism collapses. If we do not succeed, capital itself progressively abolishes wage slavery by replacing living labor with automation. Thus we turn capitalist production for profit on itself; exploiting its own logic to bring it down.

The plan isn't even to build robots. It's to let capitalism build them. Just give capitalism enough rope to hang itself... But somehow I don't see engineering designed to create more efficient ways to create profit an impediment to capitalism; it merely holds the market incentivizing mechanisms hostage. Human desire generates capital as much as capital manufacturers desire. When someone robs pieces from the game, they can be easily and quickly replaced with new ones.

Side note of marginal relevance: I once knew a welder whose job it was to build platforms for robots to stand on. The maxim, 'Each according to their ability, each according to their need' assumes its greatest possible permutation here. In response, you may laugh or cry as suits you.