Aphorisms: The Burning Block No.7 - II

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From The Burning Block No.7

One who wishes to perform actions from the center should remember that the outer limits are what help us place that very center.
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The flower cares not of wars nor of love, and yet, it is used to mourn the dead and given as a gift to the beloved.
That which fills its role is celebrated by being and nonbeing.
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The mind which cannot be moved is not the mind which does not think, but rather, the mind which is a constant witness to movement.
One associates with that part of the mind which is still and, thus, is free to do with moving thoughts whatever one wishes.
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Saint Anselm imagined the greatest possible being, but by what do we measure this greatest of all possible beings? The greatest of all fulfillments. What is the greatest of all fulfillments? The farthest point possible of, not only overcoming, but of spending one's wealth.
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Reverance for the past is a refined sort of sickness. By it, one creates an alternative, utterly untouchable world against which the present can be measured as an indication of decadence. But one always needs to recreate the past in order to weigh it against modern decadence. The present and the past are equally illusory phantoms; their antipodal relationship, like most antipodal relationships, an exhaustion of the nervous system and its subsequent play on the mind. A sort of Catholic guilt in terms of existence itself is then remedied only by one's obstinate devotion, one's discursive sense of stasis ever reminding oneself of the myth one hopes to realize by no effort but by that of the negation of all which does not resemble it. Having no heaven, yet believing oneself in hell, one is resolved to spend one's life burning in the name of a future one will never taste.
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It is not uncommon to find a prophet of doom mistaking an effect of a societal collapse for a cause of it. He thinks that, because the effect may continue indefinitely, it must have existed in some form from the beginning. His subsequent exegesis will see him magically creating causes out of thin air. (An adjacent observation would note that activist groups are always talking about 'causes' but never ends and never goals. Likewise, crusades have no real end in mind either).

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The closer one comes to God, the less there is the need to 'believe' in him. On the other hand, one who refuses to believe on principle sees the concept 'God' as the cause of much that is negative in the world.
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Public executions would inspire more crime than they would deter if they were to occur today. It is hard to resist even the basest fame.
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The writer spends so much time on that which is only a small, late stage manifestation of what is budding within him. He often ends up saying less than he actually knows, lest he become the one who is written.
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Politics has proven to be nothing more than the theft of consciousness. Inciting interest and a pretense to importance are the ultimate acts of political terrorism.